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Event Coverage

This video features the final session of the 2021 Webinar Series: Migration, Security and Regional Militancy in Sabah and the Greater Sulu Celebes Sea, co-hosted by the Universiti Malaysia Sabah, the International Islamic University Malaysia, and START. This series is part of the research project “Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah,” which focuses on security issues in Sabah, Malaysia.

This webinar series aims to provide awareness, knowledge-transfer, and capacity-building in preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) based on research findings on pertinent issues related to security, migration and regional militancy in Sabah and the greater Sulu Celebes Sea. The first session explores Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah & Navigating Research Management During Pandemic. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Event Coverage

This video features the second session of the 2021 Webinar Series: Migration, Security and Regional Militancy in Sabah and the Greater Sulu Celebes Sea, co-hosted by the Universiti Malaysia Sabah, the International Islamic University Malaysia, and START. This series is part of the research project “Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah,” which focuses on security issues in Sabah, Malaysia.

This webinar series aims to provide awareness, knowledge-transfer, and capacity-building in preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) based on research findings on pertinent issues related to security, migration and regional militancy in Sabah and the greater Sulu Celebes Sea. The first session explores Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah & Navigating Research Management During Pandemic. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Event Coverage

This video features the first session of the 2021 Webinar Series: Migration, Security and Regional Militancy in Sabah and the Greater Sulu Celebes Sea, co-hosted by the Universiti Malaysia Sabah, the International Islamic University Malaysia, and START. This series is part of the research project “Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah,” which focuses on security issues in Sabah, Malaysia.

This webinar series aims to provide awareness, knowledge-transfer, and capacity-building in preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) based on research findings on pertinent issues related to security, migration and regional militancy in Sabah and the greater Sulu Celebes Sea. The first session explores Divergent Dimensions of Radicalization Risk: Migration and Violent Extremism in Sabah & Navigating Research Management During Pandemic. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Event Coverage

In this video, Egle E. Murauskaite and Devin H. Ellis brief the insights from the Escalation Management project with a broad audience of U.S. experts and security practitioners in an online seminar hosted by NSI, Inc. Drawing on the International Crisis Behavior (ICB) database, they discuss the link between proxy involvement and the use of violence in international crises. Their findings challenge the popular belief that the use of proxies is a good way to minimize costs for a state involved in a conflict, and point to the broad escalation potential in crises involving proxies. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

This event is the latest in NSI’s SMA Speaker Series, which features leading experts discussing major challenges facing Combatant Commands, allies, and the world. Event archives include: audio or video recordings when available, written summaries of presentations, and speaker bios and briefing materials. If you would like to sign up to receive event invitations for the SMA Speaker Series, contact Nicole Peterson at npeterson@nsiteam.com.

Event Coverage

In this video, START Director William Braniff offers a virtual lecture titled "A Tale of Two Caliphates,” comparing and contrasting al-Qa’ida’s global jihadist agenda with that of the Islamic State, considering the implications of the competition between the two, and offering a grand-strategic response to the enduring threat posed by both. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government. Please send an email to start-events@umd.edu to receive a link to a recording with closed captions.

Event Coverage

In this video, WMD Warfare and Drone Swarms Analyst Zachary Kallenborn provides a virtual talk on “Swarms of Mass Destruction: Are Drone Swarms Weapons of Mass Destruction?” moderated by START researcher Steve Sin. From the United States to China and Spain, numerous states are developing drone swarms. The technology has the potential to become a new weapon of destruction akin to chemical weapons, non-contagious biological weapons, and potentially low-yield nuclear weapons. Armed, fully autonomous drone swarms can bypass any arbitrary threshold for "mass destruction" and the limits of autonomous decision-making coupled with the complexity of swarms means the weapons cannot effectively discriminate between civilian and military targets. In considering traditional WMD roles, drone swarms could be effective mass casualty weapons, but are not likely to be effective strategic deterrents. Drone swarms could be useful anti-access/ area-denial and assassination weapons, depending on context. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government. 

Event Coverage

In this video, University of Essex Senior Lecturer Dr. Brian J. Phillips provides a virtual talk on “How Did 9/11 Affect Terrorism Research? A Look at Disciplines and Gender.” Terrorism research increased markedly after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Beyond increasing, how has research on this subject changed in the past 20 years? I examine data on more than 6,000 academic articles on terrorism between 1970 and 2019, and the more than 1,600 authors of multiple articles. Several interesting findings emerge. (1) The post-9/11 proliferation of terrorism research does not appear to be winding down. (2) The proportion of terrorism research in terrorism and conflict journals decreased after 9/11, with other types of journals starting to publish a great deal of terrorism research. (3) Psychologists became the dominant subgroup of terrorism researchers after 9/11, displacing Political Scientists, although this trend appears to have now reversed. (4) The proportion of female scholars increased substantially after 9/11, outpacing the rise in academia generally. The seems to be at least in part because scholars new to the field after 9/11 were often from relatively gender-balanced disciplines such as psychology. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government. Please send an email to start-events@umd.edu to receive a link to a recording with closed captions.

Event Coverage

In this video, presenters Alastair Reed, Haroro Ingram and Sukanya Podder speak on a RESOLVE Network Forum panel about “Getting to the Source: The Importance and Challenges of Field Research on Violent Extremism.” This is the final event for the International Symposium on Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism (ICVE) in Malaysia and Southeast Asia, a multi-disciplinary symposium that aims to bring together scholars, researchers, and practitioners from the region and around the world to promote collaboration, present research findings, and discuss policy implication on preventing/countering violent extremism. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Event Coverage

In this video, presenters Hafiza Nur Adeen, Avdi Smajljaj, Yuliyanto Yuliyanto and Donny Michael speak on a panel moderated by Amy Pate about the second session of “P/CVE between Security and Resilience: Narratives, Social Media and Politics.” This is the fifth event for the International Symposium on Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism (ICVE) in Malaysia and Southeast Asia, a multi-disciplinary symposium that aims to bring together scholars, researchers, and practitioners from the region and around the world to promote collaboration, present research findings, and discuss policy implication on preventing/countering violent extremism. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Presentations include:

Hafiza Nur Adeen (Student Scholar Presenter), Mapping Small and Fuzzy Networks of Malaysian Islamist Radical Militancy Through Social Network Analysis and Geo-Spatial: An Investigation of Domestic and Foreign Connections from 2012 to 2020 Avdi Smajljaj, Machiavelising The Transcendental: Employing The Transcendental Into Pursuing Of Political Objectives Based On Principles Of Realism, As Ideological Drivers Of Current Violent Extremism And Terrorism Having Reference To Religion Donny Michael and Yuliyanto Yuliyanto, Deradicalization of Terrorist Prisoners through Individual Treatment
Event Coverage

In this video, presenters Hafiz Iman, Nicky C. Cardenas, Min Thang and Abubakar Usman Abubakar speak on a panel moderated by Amy Pate about “P/CVE between Security and Resilience: Narratives, Social Media and Politics.” This is the fourth event for the International Symposium on Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism (ICVE) in Malaysia and Southeast Asia, a multi-disciplinary symposium that aims to bring together scholars, researchers, and practitioners from the region and around the world to promote collaboration, present research findings, and discuss policy implication on preventing/countering violent extremism. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this video are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of START, the University of Maryland or the United States government.

Presentations include:

Hafiz Iman (Student Scholar Presenter), Uncovering unknown perpetrators in Attacks on The Global Terrorism Database (GTD) using Spatial and Temporal Filtering Techniques Nicky C. Cardenas, Validity of Counter Violent Extremism (CVE) Strategies in South East Asia: ASEAN’s Centrality on Regional Peace-building and Security Min Thang, Ethnic and Religious Nationalism: A Historical Study of Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar Abubakar Usman Abubakar, Brethren in Terror: A Comparative Analysis of the Digital Campaigns of ISIS and Boko Haram

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