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Policymakers and Law Enforcement Must Consider the Unintended Consequences of Their Proposed Responses to Extremist and Terrorist Groups


Policymakers and Law Enforcement Must Consider the Unintended Consequences of Their Proposed Responses to Extremist and Terrorist Groups

Abstract: 

The 9/11 attacks dramatically impacted American society,  Greater numbers of scholars from a variety of disciplines began to engage terrorism research.  Their goal was to increase understanding of a topic that pre-9/11 might have been viewed as a fringe research area.  Lum, Kennedy, and Sherley (2006) systematically reviewed over 14,000 studies that evaluated the effectiveness of counterterrorism measures, published since the early 1970s.  They found that over 50% of the studies were published post 9/11.  This conclusion is not suprising because such 'enormous' events help justify the need for changes to be implemented.  Accordingly, there was an expectation that policy makers and law enforcement personnel would build upon these studies to develop effective and innovative tactics to combat terrorism.

Publication Information

Full Citation: 

Chermak, Steven, and Joshua Freilich, David Caspi. 2009. "Policymakers and Law Enforcement Must Consider the Unintended Consequences of Their Proposed Responses to Extremist and Terrorist Groups." In Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Policy: Policy Proposals from the American Society of Criminology Conference, eds. Natasha A. Frost, Joshua D. Freilich, Todd R. Clear. Belmont, CA:Wadsworth.

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