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Don't Tread on Me: Masculine Honor Ideology in the U.S. and Militant Responses to Terrorism


Don't Tread on Me: Masculine Honor Ideology in the U.S. and Militant Responses to Terrorism

Abstract: 

Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the United States with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals’ honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the United States has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people’s responses to terrorism.

Publication Information

Full Citation: 

Barnes, Collin D., and Ryan P. Brown, Lindsey L. Osterman. 2012. "Don't Tread on Me: Masculine Honor Ideology in the U.S. and Militant Responses to Terrorism." Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (July): 1018-1029.  http://psp.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/05/02/0146167212443383

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