A Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence led by the University of Maryland

A consortium of researchers dedicated to improving the understanding of the human causes and consequences of terrorism

An Experimental Study of the Effects of Government Terror Warnings on Political Attitudes


An Experimental Study of the Effects of Government Terror Warnings on Political Attitudes

How do concerns about terrorism affect the way Americans view the 2008 presidential candidates? How would an event that increases the prominence of terrorism, like a threat or attack, affect the 2008 election? The purpose of this study is to examine the role that exposure to terror threats has on the American public’s view of presidential candidates and candidate preferences; specifically, the effect that terror threats have on political attitudes. Moreover, researchers were interested in if Americans' view of the war on terror remained the same or changed. The survey was conducted by Knowledge Networks (KN) over the Internet in May 2006, using a nationally representative sample of 1282 American adults. KN recruits panel members over the telephone via random digit dialing (RDD) and provides them with WebTV equipment in exchange for their participation in weekly surveys, which they complete online.

Other Investigators: 

Robb Willer

Dataset: 
2008